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Please help me settle an agrument with my husband...is 2% milk another name for whole milk?


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My hubby says 2% milk is Whole Milk and obviously I don't agree. I am transitioning recipes and I want healthy without cutting flavor.

The food police are screaming..."Robbyn...step away from the heavy cream."

I've found half and half is an adequate swap for things like quiche...and buttermilk is already low fat so that's a great swap for pancakes, waffles and mashed potatoes...but in some recipes I want to scale down more and I thought 2 percent was a good swap.

My cousin Gina and I are going to have a local cable cooking show (on facebook see "What's for dinner? With Robbyn & Gina") and although I believe you can eat anything in moderation, there will be shows I plan to talk about my planned life change and I prepare "favorites" with a lighter touch.

Also, if anyone has a lapband friendly recipe feel free to post it on the facebook page for the show. If we use it, we'll give you credit...I promise.

xo

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:)

My hubby says 2% milk is Whole Milk and obviously I don't agree. I am transitioning recipes and I want healthy without cutting flavor.

The food police are screaming..."Robbyn...step away from the heavy cream."

I've found half and half is an adequate swap for things like quiche...and buttermilk is already low fat so that's a great swap for pancakes, waffles and mashed potatoes...but in some recipes I want to scale down more and I thought 2 percent was a good swap.

My cousin Gina and I are going to have a local cable cooking show (on facebook see "What's for dinner? With Robbyn & Gina") and although I believe you can eat anything in moderation, there will be shows I plan to talk about my planned life change and I prepare "favorites" with a lighter touch.

Also, if anyone has a lapband friendly recipe feel free to post it on the facebook page for the show. If we use it, we'll give you credit...I promise.

xo

My understanding is that whole milk is 3.5% fat while 2% is 2%. My wife, Nicole uses either 1% or skim (which is basically white coloured water) and that works okay. Her best dish is bacon wrapped sausage, but thats not exactly low-fat. lol

Also check out the recipe section on the forum, there are tons of them.

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Hey Robbyn--

I just read the ordeal that you went through without getting your lap-band. Man, sorry sorry sorry. Thank goodness you are all right. Rocky Balboa, heh? Have you been doing the "Adrienne" thing? (haha-sorry)

TV cooking show?!! How cool!!

I have a gallon of milk in my refrigerator right now that states "Reduced fat". The milkfat % is listed as 2%. I hope this helps.

Diana

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2% is most definitely not the same! Plus, try fat free half and half, it really does taste the same as regular half and half. I switched that for my coffee and never tasted any different! Good luck with the show, that is toooo cool. I would love to check out your recipes too!

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Thank you for confirming what I thought! I have to admit, I didn't know there was fat free half and half. Isn't half and half a mixture of cream and milk?

I'm feeling much better after yesterday's very close call.

I posted a wonderful lapband friendly recipe to the cooking facebook group page today. It's called Paprika Chicken.

http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/group.p...4358&ref=ts

Thank you so much for the encouragement.

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Use the following chart to compare the nutrient values of the different types of milk:

skim 1% 2% whole

kcal 80 100 120 150

protein 8 8 8 8

CHO 12 12 12 12

fat sat. 0 2.5 5 8

fat 0 1.6 3 5

cholesterol 4 10 18 33

vitamin D 98 IU 98 IU 98 IU 98 IU

calcium 300 mg 300 mg 300 mg 290 mg

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At Costco, they have wole milk with 4% milkfat and reduced fat milk with 2% milkfat. They used to have lowfat milk with 1% milkfat but they stopped carrying it and now I have to buy it at the regular grocery. And, of course there is skim which I agree with Cujo is nothing more than colored water and probably would not make a good substitute for whole milk.

I think 1/2 and 1/2 is a mixture and cream and whole milk 4%. I have not tried fat free 1/2 and 1/2. I generally do not like the fat free versions of dairy products, they never taste "right" to me.

I hope everything works out with your surgery and I am sorry to hear about the allergy thing.

A cooking show, how fun is that!

Good luck.

Dawn

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Here's an interesting tidbit. Many of you know I'm really focused on changing how I eat, focused more on organic natural foods. In this new lifestyle, we actually drink "real" milk, the really heavy stuff you have to shake, or cream. And the truth is I normally drink milk with my tea (use to be coffee) so the cream is fine – I like it. (We just added dairy back into our diet)

It’s just another viewpoint – its pretty interesting learning all of this. I lost the pesky 10 pounds I gained over the winter in 2 weeks. (I'm loven Onvo). I'm not drinking unpasteurized milk yet - and I grew up on a farm and that's all I ever drank going up. (After I milked them and cleaned the milk up with cheesecloth) But unless I know the source I don't go there. I'm drinking organic cream right now.

"Skimming" the Fat

By Jon Herring

Millions of people drink skim milk to help keep their weight down. But new evidence has shown that skim milk - not, as you may expect, full-fat milk - actually makes you gain weight.

That's the result of a recent Harvard study of 12,829 children ages 9 to 14 published in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. And it shocked the medical establishment.

But farmers weren't surprised. When they want to fatten a pig, they feed it skim milk. Here's why: Removing the milk fat (cream) leaves only the milk sugar (lactose) ... and an unbalanced, sugary drink that leads to weight gain.

Your best bet? Stick to raw, unpasteurized milk. It's pure, natural, and loaded with the nutrients your body needs. Find a real milk dairy farm that serves your area at www.realmilk.com.

Remember, as we’ve discussed, real foods means whole foods mean unfragmented foods.

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Intriguing...sounds similar to something I read in the book "French Women Don't Get Fat." Thank you for posting this.

Until a few years ago I cooked everything low fat...skim...and the like, but ironically enough, I found that I ate smaller portions of foods I didn't skinny down. I think something in my brain thought that since it was a skinny version I could afford to eat a bigger portion.

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